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Density of Elements

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The density of elements in the periodic table is a measure of the number of atoms and their mass when they occupy a certain volume of space.

Density is a measure of the number of particles in a given volume of a substance usually given as the amount of mass in a given volume measured in grams per cm3 or g/cm3. We can work out the density of an object by dividing the mass of the object by the known volume. If we examine two different elements for example Iron and water. Iron has a density of 7.874 g/cm3 meaning that for every cm3 of volume there are 7.874 grams of iron in that volume. Compared to water which has a density of 1g/cm3 so iron has nearly 7 times the density of water. But if we look further down the periodic table at elements like Uranium and Gold both have a density which is greater than 19, meaning they are 19 times more dense than water. The element with the highest known density is osmium with a density of 22.5g/cm3.

Terms in section
Density

Density is a measure of the number of particles as mass (measured in g) in a given volume of 3 dimensional space (measured in cm3)

Volume

Volume is a measure of 3 dimensional space that a substance can occupy measured in cm3. Volume is used to measure gases, solids, and liquids.

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