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The Origins of the Periodic Table

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The origins on the periodic table begin with the work of John Newlands and Dimitri Mendeleev.

The origins of the periodic table lie in the work of a British scientist, John Newlands. In 1863, John Newlands divided the known 56 elements of matter into 11 groups. He did this based on their chemical properties and how they reacted. It wasn’t until 1869, that Dimitri Mendeleev took this work and began to order them by their Atomic Number as well, importantly leaving gaps in the periodic table for undiscovered elements. The layout of Mendeleev's periodic table led to the adoption of Groups and Periods to relate the relative position of elements with similar characteristics.

Terms in section
Atomic number

Atomic number is the number of protons in the nucleus

John Newlands

John Newlands was a British scientist who divided 56 elements into groups

Group

Groups are the columns of the periodic table where the elements are arranged vertically due to their similarities of properties.

Period

Periods are the rows of the periodic table. As you go along periods the number of protons and neutrons increases and the number of electron shells remains the same.

Dimitri Mendeleev

Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian scientist who in 1869 proposed the first structure of the periodic table

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Transition Metals as Colored Compounds

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The Atomic Structure in the Periodic Table

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