Elements
35

Br

Bromine

Bromine (Br) is a red brown liquid non metal. It has the atomic number 35 in the periodic table. It is located in Group 17, the Halogens. It has the symbol Br.

Bromine derives its name from the ancient Greek word for ‘Stench’ - Bromos. Much like Chlorine and Fluorine it has a strong smell. Bromine is a very reactive element and does not occur freely n nature but instead exists as white/colourless crystalline solids as halide salts. It is however easily found in sea water and is commonly extracted in brine pools. Bromine has a number of uses but it is primarily used as a fire retardent. It also has a wide use in photography as film. Bromine was discovered by Carl Jacob Löwig and Antoine Balard who independently discovered the liquid in 1825 and 1826. Both succeeded in isolating Bromine from different compounds. Löwig isolated the bromine from water samples in Germany using chlorine and diethyl ether to isolate a brown solid. But it was Balard who using the ash of seaweed produced Bromine and published his discovery first. It is located in Group 17 and it has a melting point of -7°c and a boiling point of 58°c being a liquid at room temperature.

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FAQ's

What is the Melting Point for Bromine?

Bromine has a Melting Point of -7.2°F, meaning at -7.2°F it will turn to a liquid.

What is the Boiling Point for Bromine?

Bromine has a Boiling Point of 58.78°F, meaning at 58.78°F it will turn to a Gas.

What is the Electronegativity of Bromine?

Bromine's Electronegativty is 2.96. Electronegativity is a measure of how strongly atoms attract bonding electrons to themselves.

What is the Heat of Vaporization of Bromine?

Bromine has a Heat of Vaporization of 15.438 kJ/mol.

Uses

It was once used in large quantities to make a compound that removed lead compound build up in engines burning leaded gasoline. Now it is primarily used in dyes, disinfectants, and photographic chemicals.

Sources

Occurs in compounds in sea water.

35
Protons
35
Electrons
45
Neutrons

Br

Element Symbol
Br
Atomic Weight
79.904
Atomic Number
35
State
Liquid
Melting Point
Unknown
-7.2
°C
Boiling Point
58.78
Unknown
°C
Heat of Vaporization
15.438
Unknown
kJ/mol
Crystal Structure
Orthorhombic
Thermoconductivity
0.00122
Unknown
W/cmK
Shells
2,8,18,7
Group
Halogen
Period
4
Block
P Block
Orbitals
[Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p5
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion
--
Covalent Radius
1.14 Å
Density at 293K
3.119 g/cm³
Electrical Conductivity
--
First Ionization Potential
11.8138 V
Second Ionization Potential
21.8 V
Third Ionization Potential
36.0 V
Ionic Radius
1.96 (-1) Å
Oxydation States
(±1),5
Lattice Parameter
--
Lattice Parameter 2
--
Lattice Parameter 3
--
Pronounced

BRO-meen

Discovered by

Antoine J. Balard

Discovery date

1826

Orbital configuration
2,8,18,7

Download the Periodic Table

Explore Other Halogens

35.453
17

Cl

Chlorine
18.998
9

F

Fluorine
210
85

At

Astatine
126.904
53

I

Iodine
The halogens are located in group 17 (formally known as group VIIA) on the left of the noble gases on the periodic table. These five toxic, non-metallic elements make up group 17 and consist of: fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), iodine (I) and astatine (As).
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