Elements
1

H

Hydrogen

Hydrogen (H) is a tasteless, colorless, odorless gas and has the atomic number 1. It is a noble gas, non-metal and is the most abundant element in the universe.

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. Being constructed of 1 proton and 1 electron it has no neutrons. It is used in industrial processes such as the Haber process and the hydrogenation of fats. Hydrogen is being explored as use for a fuel. It is possible to combust Hydrogen with Oxygen to create water as a by product and generate electricity in a cell. It has a large use in powering rockets in the NASA space program due to its high combustibility. It was used in the German airship, the Hindenburg which tragically exploded due to the flammable nature of Hydrogen in 1937. Hydrogen is located usually in Group 1 but can also be located in the centre of the periodic table. As it is a non metal if it is located in Group 1 it can be misleading. It has a melting point of -259°c and a boiling point of -252°c. Hydrogen exists as a diatomic molecule, where two Hydrogen atoms are covalently bonded together. Hydrogen was discovered by Robert Boyle in 1671 from his work reacting acids and metals together but it was not until 1766 that the scientist Henry Cavendish isolated it as an element.

Download Hydrogen as a printable and fully scalable image

Get the free download here (JPEG, PDF, SVG)

FAQ's

What is the Melting Point for Hydrogen?

Hydrogen has a Melting Point of -259.2°F, meaning at -259.2°F it will turn to a liquid.

What is the Boiling Point for Hydrogen?

Hydrogen has a Boiling Point of -252.77°F, meaning at -252.77°F it will turn to a Gas.

What is the Electronegativity of Hydrogen?

Hydrogen's Electronegativty is 2.2. Electronegativity is a measure of how strongly atoms attract bonding electrons to themselves.

What is the Heat of Vaporization of Hydrogen?

Hydrogen has a Heat of Vaporization of 0.44936 kJ/mol.

Uses

Most hydrogen is used in the production of ammonia. Also used in balloons and in metal refining. Also used as fuel in rockets. Its two heavier isotopes are: deuterium (D) and tritium (T) used respectively for nuclear fission and fusion.

Sources

Commercial quantities are produced by reacting superheated steam with methane or carbon. In lab work from reaction of metals with acid solutions or electrolysis.

1
Protons
1
Electrons
0
Neutrons

H

Element Symbol
H
Atomic Weight
1.008
Atomic Number
1
State
Gas
Melting Point
Unknown
-259.2
°C
Boiling Point
-252.77
Unknown
°C
Heat of Vaporization
0.44936
Unknown
kJ/mol
Crystal Structure
Hexagonal
Thermoconductivity
0.001815
Unknown
W/cmK
Shells
1
Group
Non-Metal
Period
1
Block
S Block
Orbitals
1s1
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion
--
Covalent Radius
0.32 Å
Density at 293K
0.00008988 g/cm³
Electrical Conductivity
--
First Ionization Potential
13.5984 V
Second Ionization Potential
--
Third Ionization Potential
--
Ionic Radius
1.54 (+1) Å
Oxydation States
±1
Lattice Parameter
--
Lattice Parameter 2
10.478 Å
Lattice Parameter 3
3.584 Å
Pronounced

HI-dreh-jen

Discovered by

Henry Cavendish

Discovery date

1766

Orbital configuration
1

Download the Periodic Table

Explore Other Non-Metals

30.974
15

P

Phosphorus
78.971
34

Se

Selenium
32.06
16

S

Sulphur
15.999
8

O

Oxygen
14.007
7

N

Nitrogen
12.011
6

C

Carbon
Non-metals are the substances that do not exhibit such characteristic of metals as hardness, mechanical adaptability or the ability to conduct electricity. This series contains a few non-metals located in different groups of the periodic table: hydrogen (H), carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), oxygen (O), sulfur (S) and selenium (Se).
Previous

Oganesson

118
Next

Helium

2