Elements
29

Cu

Copper

Pronounced

KOP-er

Copper is a reddish orange metal that has the atomic number 29 in the periodic table. It is a Transition metal and located in Group 11 of the periodic table. It has the symbol Cu.

Copper (Cu) is a soft and malleable metal that has a high thermal and electrical conductivity. It unlike a lot of transition metals is a pinkish-orange. It has a wide range of uses but mainly as an electrical conductor and building material due to its strength and cheap cost. Copper is one of the few metals on earth that occurs naturally in the earth’s crust. Due to its relative abundance in the earth’s crust it has been widely used by humans for many years. It was first used around 8000BC an lead to the creation of Bronze when it was smelted with tin around 3500BC. The name Copper stems from the Old English Coper which can trace its derivation back to the Latin Cuprum. Copper salts are widely used in industry such as copper sulphate a light blue solution or copper oxide either a black or green powder dependent on its oxidation state. Copper has a lot of uses in biological compounds found in enzymes and blood. It also has a use in antimicrobial applications to kill bacteria. It is located in Group 11 and it has a melting point of 1084°c and a boiling point of 2562°c being a solid metal at room temperature.

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FAQ's

What is the Melting Point for Copper?

Copper has a Melting Point of 1083°C, meaning at 1083°C it will turn to a liquid.

What is the Boiling Point for Copper?

Copper has a Boiling Point of 2567°C, meaning at 2567°C it will turn to a Gas.

What is the Electronegativity of Copper?

Copper's Electronegativty is 1.9. Electronegativity is a measure of how strongly atoms attract bonding electrons to themselves.

Discovered by

Known to the ancients.

Discovery date

9000 BC

What is the Heat of Vaporization of Copper?

Copper has a Heat of Vaporization of 300.3 kJ/mol.

Uses

Most often used as an electrical conductor. Also used in the manufacture of water pipes. Its alloys are used in jewelry and for coins.

Sources

Pure copper occurs rarely in nature. Usually found in sulfides as in chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), coveline (CuS), chalcosine (Cu2S) or oxides like cuprite (Cu2O).

29
Protons
29
Electrons
35
Neutrons

Cu

Element Symbol
Cu
Atomic Weight
63.546
Atomic Number
29
State
Solid
Melting Point
Unknown
1083
°C
Boiling Point
2567
Unknown
°C
Heat of Vaporization
300.3
Unknown
kJ/mol
Crystal Structure
Cubic: Face centered
Thermoconductivity
4.01
Unknown
W/cmK
Shells
2,8,18,1
Group
Transition Metal
Period
4
Block
D Block
Orbitals
[Ar] 3d10 4s1
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion
16.5 10^-6 K^-1
Covalent Radius
1.17 Å
Density at 293K
8.96 g/cm³
Electrical Conductivity
0.596 10^6/cm ohm
First Ionization Potential
7.7264 V
Second Ionization Potential
20.292 V
Third Ionization Potential
36.83 V
Ionic Radius
.73 (+2) Å
Oxydation States
(2),1
Lattice Parameter
3.6148 Å
Lattice Parameter 2
--
Lattice Parameter 3
--
Orbital configuration
2,8,18,1

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Explore Other Transition Metals

Transition metal is any of various chemical elements that have valence electrons (electrons that can participate in the formation of chemical bond) in two shells instead of only one. They form group 3 (IIIb) through group 12 (IIb).
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